Bijgewerkt: 4 december 2021

11de Kersenbloesem Festival - 2011

Foto's -> Natuur -> Kersenbloesem Festival
Cherry Blossom Festival


11de Kersenbloesem Festival
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

In het Amsterdamse Bos werd op woensdag 6 april 2011 het Cherry Blossom Festival (kersenbloesemfestival) gehouden. Het festival werd voor de 11de keer door de gemeenten Amstelveen, Amsterdam, Haarlemmermeer, Almere en de Japanse ambassade georganiseerd en is ontstaan ter viering van de meer dan 400 jaar betrekkingen tussen Nederland en Japan.

In oktober 2000 schonk The Japan Women's Club in Amstelveen 400 kersenbloesembomen aan de bevolking van Nederland, ter gelegenheid van de 400 jarige betrekkingen tussen Japan en Nederland. Sinds die tijd organiseert de Japanse ambassade in Den Haag, samen met een aantal organisaties, waaronder The Japan Women's Club, elk jaar rond eind maart een 'hanamimatsuri' (Cherry Blossom Festival) in de Kersentuin in Amstelveen.

Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

Keramiste Lidy Leegstra komt met haar Japanse cursisten
op weg naar het raadhuis


Het programma van het 11de Cherry Blossomfestival was in vergelijking met voorgaande jaren zeer bescheiden en zakelijk, vanwege de aardbeving en tsunami, met alle gevolgen daarvan in Japan. Jan van Zanen, burgemeester van Amstelveen leidde de tocht naar de Kersentuin langs de veenplas 'De Poel'.

Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

Jan van Zanen, burgemeester van Amstelveen begeleidt de Japanse delegatie naar de Kersentuin. De tocht begint bij het raadhuis


Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

Vlnr: Rechter dhr. Hisashi Owada, voorzitter van het Internationale Hof van Justitie, Jan van Zanen, burgemeester van Amstelveen en dhr. Takashi Koezuka de ambassadeur van Japan in Nederland lopen langs 'De Poel'. In de achtergrond is de Bovenkerkse St. Urbanuskerk te zien


Zijne Excellentie de heer Takashi Koezuka de ambassadeur van Japan in Nederland, de heer K. Kato voorzitter van de Japanse Kamer van Koophandel, mevrouw Annemarie Jorritsma-Lebbink, burgemeester van Almere en loco-burgemeester de heer Ben Scholten, de heer Eberhard van der Laan, burgemeester van Amsterdam en de heer Arthur van Dijk burgemeester van Haarlemmermeer, mevr. Laila Driessen-Jansen gedeputeerde van Provincie van Noord-Holland, de heer Chris Buijink secretaris-generaal van het Ministerie van Economische Zaken, Landbouw & Innovatie en de heer Frans van Lanschot, Honorair Consul-generaal van Japan in Amsterdam liepen met de honderden mensen mee.

In het midden van de Kersentuin was een reusachtige tent gebouwd, waar een sobere herdenking werd georganiseerd. Van feeststemming was er geen sprake, want de sprekers op deze prachtige lentedag waren op de ramp in Japan geconcentreerd.

Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

De mensen lopen op de Doorweg, richting het Amsterdamse Bos


Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

In het Amsterdamse Bos staat een grote tent, waar het Cherry Blossom festival wordt gehouden


Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

Lange rij wachtende mensen voor de tent


Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

Iedere bezoeker krijgt een papieren kraanvogeltje


Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

Jonge Japanse meisjes brengen nog wat kraanvogels naar de tent


De eerste spreker was professor dr. W. R. van Gulik en na hem kwam Jan van Zanen, burgemeester van Amstelveen, om de mensen in de tent toespreken. De volgende spreker was Zijne Excellentie dhr. Takashi Koezuka de ambassadeur van Japan in Nederland, waarna dhr. K. Kato voorzitter van de Japanse Kamer van Koophandel het woord kreeg. Als laatste hield de heer Chris Buijink secretaris-generaal van het Ministerie van Economische Zaken, Landbouw & Innovatie zijn toespraak. Daarna kwam Kees Koot bij de microfoon staan en las zijn gedicht voor. Vervolgens volgde het moment van stilte voor de slachtoffers van de ramp in Japan.

Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

Professor dr. W. R. van Gulik tijdens zijn toespraak


Toespraak burgemeester Van Zanen
Ladies and gentlemen, (Konnichiwa) A warm welcome to Cherry Blossom Park
This year the Cherry Blossom festival differs from other years.This year the purpose is, to provide support and show sympathy to the victims of the recent catastrophe in Japan. The blossom that you see today contrasts sharply with the suffering from the horrors in Japan.

The impact on Japan and its citizens will be printed in our memories for ever. In your memory, in mine and in all of those who have gathered here in Amstelveen at the Cherry Blossom Park.

A lot of time will have to pass before the effects from this catastrophe have disappeared. But we know from experience in the past that the Japanese people are very strong. The heavy earth quake from 1995 in the city of Kobe has demonstrated this.
Japan and The Netherlands have longtime relations. In this historic relation we have shared and endured good and bad times. At the moment people are developing all kinds of initiatives, which we all wholeheartedly support. For instance benefit concerts, charity diners and bazaars are taking place everywhere in the Netherlands.

On April 13th, a benefit soccer match will be played between Ajax and the Japanese premier-league club Shimizu S-pulse. The proceeds of all these activities will be donated to the Japanese Red Cross. The fact, that Dutch people feel so involved with the great distress in Japan, fills us with intense warmth. Dutch people are making all kinds of donations to Japan.

Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

Jan van Zanen, burgemeester van Amstelveen spreekt de mensen toe


This shows how great the involvement is between our two countries. In addition to all the initiatives, we – the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area – believe it is important to show our own involvement with Japan and it’s people.

A delegation from the Amsterdam Area will visit Japan by the end of May to show sympathy to the people and the business community. We will offer our support and help where ever possible.

Due to the extent of this catastrophe,we feel sorrow and grief. (Kokoro-kara omimai moo-sjie-a-ngemas). I am proud that so many organisations were willing to work together in order to turn this traditional Cherry Blossom festival into a gathering where we can all share the suffering, as well as love and hope.

And I would like to thank:
The Japanese embassy, the Japanese chamber of commerce, the Japan Women’s Club, the cities of Almere, Amsterdam and Haarlemmermeer. The Netherlands-Japan Association and the employees of the city of Amstelveen.

Ladies and Gentlemen,
I invite you all to enjoy the Cherry Blossom Park, while our thoughts are with those who lost their loved ones in the recent catastrophe in Japan March 11th 2011.

Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

Zijne Excellentie de heer Takashi Koezuka de ambassadeur van Japan in Nederland leest zijn toespraak voor


Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

De heer K. Kato, voorzitter van de Japanse Kamer van Koophandel verlaat het podium na zijn toespraak


Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

De heer Chris Buijink, secretaris-generaal van het Ministerie van Economische Zaken, Landbouw en Innovatie aan het woord


Speech by the Secretary-General to the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation, Chris Buijink

Your Excellency, Mayor Van Zanen,
Dear friends from Japan,
Ladies and gentlemen,
"Ceaselessly the river flows, and yet the water is never the same, while in the still pools the shifting foam gathers and is gone, never staying for a moment. People and their dwellings are like that."

These are the opening words that Kamo no Chomei wrote in his Hôjôki some 800 years ago. Words many of you grew up with. Words that say how unpredictable water is. Fluid and fleeting. Just like life itself.

People from Japan and Holland know about the power of water. The power to give life and to take life. Yet time and again, water takes us by surprise. We cannot begin to imagine the ordeal that the people from Japan are going through. Many of us have been watching the images in disbelief.

As FT journalist David Pilling described: “The water picked up houses and boats and cars and people. It then sucked back before lunging at the towns again, the debris in its churning waters now transformed into lethal weapons that smashed through walls and metal and teeth and bones. […]

For those who had not managed to flee to higher ground, the tsunami’s progress was unstoppable and its vengeance was swift.” Yet as we were watching those images of devastation, day in and day out, something else started to grow: our admiration for the people of Japan.

Their courage and resilience. Their calm and perseverance. Their sense of community and their tranquil resolve.

On behalf of the Dutch government and Vice Prime Minister Maxime Verhagen, I have come today with a message of sympathy, solidarity and admiration. We cherish our 400 year old bonds with Japan. We are proud to be home to the third largest Japanese community in Europe. And we highly value the many Japanese companies that have settled in the Netherlands.

I have heard many stories first hand from my Japanese friends and colleagues in the past weeks. I have also been in touch with people at Japanese companies and at the Japanese Chamber of Commerce. And I was struck by the resilience that I encountered.
Let me quote the president of Mitsubishi Motors, who said it all in his response to my enquiries: “Getting back to ‘life as usual’ as soon as possible, is the way that we can support society and [we can] show how resilient Japan is.”
We wish you all the very best in surmounting current difficulties and restarting operations. We want to be true friends to all of you in these times of great adversity and sorrow. As friends, should you wish so, we are most willing to assist the Japanese authorities and companies in any way we can, both in your home country and abroad. Be it to guarantee the safety of citizens and consumers, to help with relief operations or to participate in the reconstruction efforts.

My latest visit to Japan was in December. I went to visit Mitsubishi Motors and colleagues at Gaimusho and METI. As always, I was struck by the Japanese organisational talent, innovative power and community spirit. That talent, that power and that spirit make me optimistic about the future.

Dear friends,
As the cherry trees are blossoming and the cranes are returning, Japan wíll enter a new spring. We are at your side.

Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

Het herdenkingsbord in de Kersentuin


Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

Burgemeester van Zanen en de leden van de Japanse delegatie met de papieren kraanvogels bij het herdenkingsbord


Cherry Blossom Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

Een teken van hoop in de Kersentuin







De inhoud van alle toespraken concentreerde zich (in het Engels) op de driedubbele ramp in Japan, die op 11 maart 2011 plaatsvond in Japan. Na een aardbeving werden grote delen van het land getroffen door een vernietigende tsunami, welke het land tevens in een nucleair drama trok. De Japanse sprekers waren heel blij, dat het Nederlandse volk samen met de Japanners, zo veel benefietacties hebben georganiseerd, om als steunbetuiging voor de slachtoffers geld in te zamelen.

De schade in Japan is enorm, niet alleen in geld uitgedrukt (ongeveer 300 miljard euro), maar ook de emotionele beschadiging van de overlevenden van de ramp. Bijna 150.000 huizen zijn compleet verwoest, of zwaar beschadigd en meer dan 16.000 mensen zijn nog altijd vermist. Bijna 200.000 evacués verblijven momenteel in opvangcentra, over de vele kinderen maar niet te spreken, die plotseling wees werden en nu helemaal hulpeloos zijn.

Als achtergrond op het podium waren 1000 kleurrijke van papier gevouwen kraanvogels opgehangen, het werk van keramiste Lidy Leegstra van Galerie Potterie 'Het Oude Dorp' en haar 15 Japanse cursisten. De Japanse kraanvogel (Gus Japonensis), in het Japans 'tanchôzuru', of ook wel gewoon 'tsuru', is een symbool voor Japan. De kraanvogel staat, zoals een groot aantal dieren in Japan, symbool voor geluk, voorspoed en voor een lang leven.

Iedereen kreeg bij aankomst in het park een kleine papieren kraanvogel en toen de herdenkingsdienst was afgelopen en de mensen de tent verlieten, werden de kraanvogels in de witte zakken die voor het herdenkingsmonument stonden geplaatst, met de bedoeling om ze naar Japan te sturen als geestelijke steun voor de overgebleven slachtoffers.

Na het officiële deel van het programma, gingen veel mensen het Kersenbloesempark bewonderen, want door het aanhoudende zonnig weer, staan de bomen in volle bloei. Veel Japanners waren ook aanwezig tijdens de ceremonie en buiten en binnen in de tent, werd nog lang nagepraat in de sfeervolle avondzon.

Kersenbloesem  Amstelveen
(Foto Amstelveenweb.com - 2011)

De kersenbloesemboom: de kleine bloemetjes zien er prachtig uit


Benefietwedstrijd in de Amsterdam ArenA
Een aantal betrokken Nederlanders besloot actie te ondernemen en nam het initiatief om een Japanse topclub tegen een Nederlandse topclub te laten voetballen, als steunbetuiging aan de slachtoffers en om geld in te zamelen voor hulp. Mede initiatiefnemers zijn de gemeentes Amsterdam en Amstelveen, Ajax, de Amsterdam Arena, en het Nederlandse Rode Kruis.  Amsterdam en Amstelveen hebben een grote Japanse gemeenschap.

Klik hier voor andere foto's in de categorie Natuur